Talks and Workshops

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AD110: Beginning Faculty Forum

This session is intended for instructors new to SUSS.

Participants will be introduced to concepts and strategies for pedagogically informed teaching in SUSS.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: New Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the forum, participants should be able to:

  1. Tailor the requirements of their course to the needs of SUSS students
  2. Design lessons using a range of teaching strategies
  3. Use reflection to improve teaching
AD121: T&L Conversation

This is a discussion-based sharing session intended to introduce emerging teaching and learning trends and best practices. Distinguished speakers, industry partners, or SUSS Teaching Award recipients are invited for each of these sessions to enhance teaching and learning in SUSS.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates deployed to teach for the semester, and Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the needs of SUSS students
  2. Plan and implement a good lesson with a range of appropriate teaching strategies
  3. Use reflection to improve teaching
AD132: Fundamentals of How People Learn

This workshop provides an overview of major theoretical perspectives that describe how people learn. It will discuss contemporary learning theories and approaches essential for teaching and learning. Hands-on opportunities will be provided to explore ways of designing instruction based on learning theories. Together with participants, we will also explore theories of adult learning to understand how adults learn.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe contemporary learning theories
  2. Describe several teaching approaches that foster effective learning
  3. Design instruction based on learning theories
  4. Explore theories of adult learning
AD133: Teaching Diverse Adult Learners

Adults bring with them a range of knowledge, skills, motivations, as well as work and life experiences to the learning context. How might facilitators leverage on this multiplicity of learning backgrounds, rather than pitch their lessons in a one-size-fits-all manner aimed at, and held ransom to, the hypothetical “average” learner?

This synchronous three-hour online session aims to engage participants in exploring the principles, components and some practical strategies for differentiated instruction.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Examine principles and components of differentiated instruction
  2. Analyse diversity of adult learners (Readiness, Interests and Learning Preferences)
  3. Design several pedagogical strategies for differentiated instruction
  4. Apply growth mindsets in differentiated instruction
AD135: Teaching Strategies for Student-Centred Learning

Decades of research have suggested that we need to move from teacher-centred learning to student-centred learning to help students learn better. Despite the call, many classrooms are still primarily dominated by didactic lectures.

The purpose of this workshop is to equip participants with the knowledge and skills to design and implement student-centred learning. The term student-centred learning will be unpacked during the workshop. We will discuss both the general pedagogical strategies for designing student-centred learning and specific strategies for classes with different sizes.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Define student-centred learning
  2. Describe pedagogical strategies for fostering student-centred learning
  3. Design student-centred learning in big classes
  4. Design student-centred learning in small classes
AD137: Learning Design for Adult Learners

Development of abilities that enable learners to thrive in uncertain, changing conditions places design and facilitation of learning front and centre. With the workplace in flux from dynamically changing organisational practices and global, as well as technological developments, adult educators need to constantly evolve their practices to ensure their craft keeps ahead of learning challenges.

Deep understanding, of the work of an occupation / vocation is required to deal with change; it is not developed by requiring learners to reproduce knowledge, but from the ability to co-develop and apply knowledge and skills in changing environments. Deep understanding is integral to what it means to be a particular profession or role and is a never-ending journey. IAL’s research and development of the 6 principles of learning design provides a conceptual framework aims to assist adult educators in thinking about how to design and facilitate learning that enables our learners to thrive in changing circumstances. The growing emphasis on soft skills in response to a dynamically changing environment, in the hope that the learners would then be in a better position to cope and deal with the changes, does not alone meet current and future challenges. Rather, more democratic approaches are required where learners build knowledge and learn how to keep learning over a lifetime.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify how and why the Six Principles of Learning Design (6PoLD) contribute to learners' lifelong learning capability
  2. Deliberate on the difference between traditional design and facilitation when using 6PoLD
  3. Consider the extent to which the 6PoLD reflects your own teaching and learning approaches
AD141: Using Cases to Teach

This workshop is designed to develop skills that participants can use to advance interactive and participant-centred teaching approaches. The workshop focuses on “how to” lessons on case teaching, interspersed with activities where participants work in teams to prepare case teaching plans and class openings that they present to all of the participants.

There will also be case discussions on several existing cases, combined with a “post-mortem” of what worked and what did not in both the written case and the case discussion. We will also discuss core teaching strategies including development of time management plans, whiteboard management plans, how to pose opening questions, “cold-calling” versus “warm calling”, and how to close a case-discussion class with “Take-Aways”.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for those who would like a refresher or have no prior experience with case teaching)

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the benefits and challenges of using a case teaching approach
  2. Understand the variety of learning purposes to which a case teaching approach can be put
  3. Design and implement case-driven lessons
  4. Lead a learner-centred case discussion
  5. Employ different instructional strategies to increase student engagement and learning
AD143: Case Writing for Teaching & Learning

This is a hands-on session aimed at Case Developers with the goal of crafting a usable case and supporting materials for teaching purposes by the end of the workshop. With a focus on instructional discernment in the case writing process, the session will allow time for participants to apply good practice guidelines when researching for, writing and revising engaging, generative field-based cases.

Participants will also apply principles for outlining teaching notes, proposing strategies or methods for employing the case in teaching, while drafting and evaluating guiding questions, fruitful discussion pathways and lesson pointers for use in class.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Case Developers)

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the benefits, challenges and learning opportunities of using a case-based approach
  2. Apply principles of good case writing to their own area of teaching
  3. Gain confidence in framing, researching, curating, building and revising effective cases for teaching and learning
  4. Draft a preliminary teaching note to highlight effective uses of the case being developed
AD152: Sticky Presentations – Designing Presentation Slides for Teaching

Studies have shown that 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual. Presentation slides should therefore be designed to be seen, rather than read. Yet many presenters include paragraphs of text on their slides to communicate their ideas. This trend is also observed in classrooms where educators create slides that are busy and difficult for the student to understand, let alone remember anything.

The purpose of this workshop is to equip participants with the awareness and knowledge to break away from the conventional method of presenting detailed text book information on teaching slides. We will discuss how to simplify information and to design slides that are visual (utilizing text, numbers, and images). Getting students to see information rather than to read information on slides will encourage them to listen more attentively to lectures.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify key information for visual representation on slides
  2. Analyse and divide existing information into smaller chunks for easier consumption
  3. Utilize text, numbers, diagrams, and images to define the design for teaching slides
  4. Design simplified yet impactful presentation slides for teaching
AD153: Fundamentals of Technology in Learning

Technology has fundamentally changed the way we live and the way we learn. As instructors, it is critical to understand the role of technology in learning. Technologies are tools, and they need to be used in conjunction with pedagogy to enable effective teaching and learning. The purpose of this workshop is to help participants understand the pedagogical functions of different technological tools and ways of orchestrating different technological tools for effective teaching.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the role of technology in learning
  2. Describe the pedagogical functions of different technological tools
  3. Design instructions that incorporate different technological tools for effective teaching
AD157: Digital Literacies Pedagogy

The pervasiveness of digital media in Higher Education is undeniable, and due to the complexity of technology and digital media as communication mediums, educators at the HEI level must not only be digitally literate, they must also be armed with the right digital literacy pedagogies so that students reap the benefits of using technology and digital media for the purpose of learning. As such, this workshop aims to teach educators the pedagogies of digital literacy – how to use digital media and technology both as tool and text.

As this is a blended learning workshop co-taught by lecturers from the University of Stockholm and the Singapore University of Social Sciences, participants from both Universities would be able to communicate and collaborate with each other through the use of digital media and technology. Taking a highly hands- on approach, this workshop will arm educators with different teaching activities resources that they can make use of for their own lessons.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Organise arguments in a discussion using a digital learning tool
  2. Manage online discussion forums for the purpose of teaching
  3. Design lessons that focus on digital media representation and consumption
AD159: Designing for Active Blended Learning

This workshop aims to impart the knowledge and skills of designing and implementing learning in an active blended learning environment. The topics covered in this workshop include the definitions of blended learning, the rationales for using blended learning, and the frameworks and strategies for designing active blended learning. The course will equip participants with the knowledge and skills to design blended learning using contemporary design approaches.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Define blended learning
  2. Justify the learning principles undergirding active blended learning
  3. Describe the approaches in designing blended learning
  4. Construct lesson sequences of blended learning using different technological tools
AD251: Teaching Online (Intermediate Level)

This intermediate teaching online workshop aims to equip participants with the knowledge and skills for effective online teaching. It will go beyond introducing how to use zoom for content delivering which was covered in our previous introductory teaching online workshop, and focuses on how to design online instruction with a variety of digital tools together with zoom to better engage students. Both the pedagogical and technological functions of different digital tools will be discussed in the workshop. Hands-on practice will also be provided to facilitate understanding.

Course Level: Intermediate

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty who want to go beyond merely using Zoom for content delivery. Prior knowledge and experience with online teaching using Zoom is required.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe principles of effective online teaching
  2. Describe the pedagogical functions of different digital tools for facilitating online learning
  3. Design effective online instruction with a variety of digital tools
AD255: Facilitating Technology-Supported Collaborative Learning

Collaborative learning has been recognised as an important part of education, as it may foster deeper learning. However, getting learners together does not always lead to productive interaction and effective learning. The main purpose of this workshop is to explore how we may leverage the power of technology to better facilitate students' collaborative learning. Specifically, we will discuss what makes good collaborative learning, the role of technology in supporting collaborative learning, the contemporary computer-supported collaborative learning models, as well as ways to facilitate asynchronous online discussion.

Please note that this worksohp focuses more on the pedagogy rather than the technology for collaborative learning.

Course Level: Intermediate

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the characteristics of good collaborative learning
  2. Describe the roles of technology in supporting collaborative learning
  3. Describe several computer-supported collaborative learning models
  4. Propose ways to facilitate productive online interaction and collaboration
AD355: Designing Computer Supported Knowledge Building

Knowledge Building (KB) is one of the widely used computer-supported collaborative learning models in education. It is a pedagogical approach that responds to the increasing needs for knowledge creating talents in knowledge societies. KB treats students as knowledge workers rather than passive knowledge receivers. Students are empowered to take the highest agency to chart their inquiry, monitor their inquiry process, and continually improve their community knowledge. Decades of research has shown that KB could foster students’ conceptual understanding, epistemic beliefs, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

This advanced workshop aims to equip participants with the knowledge and skills to design and implement knowledge building in their own classrooms. It consists of 3 continuous sessions (parts) spread across one month, integrating theory, practice, and reflection. Specifically, part one focuses on KB theory, principles, and technology; part two focuses on KB design and practice; and part three focuses on KB practice and reflection.

Prerequisites for registration include (1) more than one year of teaching experience, and (2) familiarisation with collaborative learning.

Course Level: Advanced

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty with more than one year of teaching experience and familiarisation with collaborative learning

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe knowledge building theory
  2. Apply technology to support knowledge building
  3. Design computer supported knowledge building classrooms
  4. Design assessment for knowledge building

Note: This is a three-part workshop. Please ensure you are able to commit to all three parts before signing up.

AD161: Fundamentals of Assessment

This workshop aims to improve the assessment literacy of participants, so that they can apply quality principles in designing fit-for-purpose assessments. This has important implications for both instructors and course developers as they seek to align curriculum, pedagogy and assessment practices.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to examine and work with quality principles in:

  1. Planning Assessment
  2. Designing Assessment
  3. Interpreting Assessment Outcomes
AD163: Constructing Multiple-choice Tests

The aim of this workshop is to help the participants develop and refine their use of multiple choice questions (MCQs) as an assessment tool.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Assessment Writers)

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to address the following:

  1. What are the forms and structures of MCQs?
  2. How to write MCQs? How many options per MCQ?
  3. What are some types of MCQs?
  4. What MCQ information and results can I get from the Canvas LMS?
  5. How to vet drafts of MCQs?
  6. How to improve MCQs? (examples)
AD165: Developing Scoring Rubrics

The workshop aims to provide participants with insight into developing purposeful and reliable scoring rubrics.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Assessment Writers)

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss what rubrics are and why use them
  2. Discuss proper/improper uses of rubrics
  3. Critique a set of rubrics
  4. Construct a set of rubrics
AD167: Giving Effective Assessment Feedback

This workshop aims to promote effective feedback cultures and practices within teaching and learning. Feedback is intended to take teaching and learning to the next level, and works with clear learning outcomes, success criteria and evidence of learning. In this context, the workshop will outline how the provision and use of effective feedback for improvement require insight into motivation, self-regulation and appropriate judgments of performance quality.

Course Level: Introductory

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the context and conditions under which feedback can positively impact learning
  2. Outline key features of good feedback practice
  3. Promote a feedback culture that encourages student, peer and teacher learning and improvement