Talks and Workshops

AD131: Assessment for Learning

Research has shown that close attention to formative assessment can greatly improve student performance, learning and outcomes.

This workshop outlines the principles, tools and strategies that can be used to bring assessment for learning (AfL) concretely into the classroom via intentional lesson planning, informed pedagogical reasoning and evidence-driven instructional decision-making, in order to take student learning to the next level.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the impetus for formative assessment and how this relates to assessment for learning (AfL) and assessment as learning
  2. Detail key frameworks and component elements of assessment for learning and elaborate on its significance
  3. Design lessons that apply various elements of assessment for learning
AD133: Teaching Diverse Learners

Given that adults bring with them a range of knowledge, skills, motivations, as well as work and life experiences, how can instructors personalize and leverage on this multiplicity of learning backgrounds, rather than pitch their lessons in a one-size-fits-all manner aimed at, and held ransom to, the hypothetical “average” learner?

This workshop aims to equip participants with a framework, philosophy, and practical strategies for coping with, and enhancing, teaching and learning in an environment of adult learner heterogeneity and diversity.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the rationale for, and key principles of, differentiated instruction
  2. Design for responsive teaching in the context of adult learner diversity
  3. Employ appropriate instructional and assessment strategies for differentiated teaching and learning
AD141: Using Cases to Teach

This workshop is designed to develop skills that participants can use to advance interactive and participant-centred teaching approaches. The workshop focuses on “how to” lessons on case teaching, interspersed with activities where the participants work in teams to do things like prepare case teaching plans and class openings that they present to all of the participants. There will be case discussions on several existing cases, combined with a “post-mortem” of what worked and what did not in both the written case and the case discussion. We will also discuss core teaching strategies including development of time management plans, whiteboard management plans, how to pose opening questions, “cold-calling” versus “warm calling,” and how to close a case-discussion class with “Take-Aways.”

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the benefits and challenges of using a case teaching approach
  2. Understand the variety of learning purposes to which a case teaching approach can be put
  3. Design and implement case-driven lessons
  4. Lead a learner-centred case discussion
  5. Employ different instructional strategies to increase student engagement and learning
AD143: Case Writing for Teaching & Learning

This is a hands-on session aimed at case developers with the goal of crafting a usable case, and supporting materials, for teaching purposes by the end of the workshop. With a focus on instructional discernment in the case writing process, the session will allow time for participants to apply good practice guidelines when researching for, writing and revising engaging, generative field-based cases.

Participants will also apply principles for outlining teaching notes, proposing strategies or methods for employing the case in teaching, while drafting and evaluating guiding questions, fruitful discussion pathways and lesson pointers for use in class.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Case Developers)

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the benefits, challenges and learning opportunities of using a case-based approach
  2. Apply principles of good case writing to their own area of teaching
  3. Gain confidence in framing, researching, curating, building and revising effective cases for teaching and learning
  4. Draft a preliminary teaching note to highlight effective uses of the case being developed
AD151: Teaching Online

This workshop aims to equip participants with the design principles and instructional strategies to thrive in both synchronous and asynchronous online learning environments. From selecting the most central learning outcomes that can be fruitfully taught online; designing the virtual space for inquiry, community, interactivity, motivation and self-regulation; and intentionally putting in place self, peer and formative assessment milestone checks and feedback pathways, this workshop will introduce and discuss evidence-based approaches to better online instruction.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe principles of effective online lesson design
  2. Recommend appropriate online instructional strategies for significant learning
  3. Propose a variety of online assessment and feedback mechanisms to improve teaching and learning
AD159: Strategies for Active Blended Learning workshop

This workshop aims to impart the skills of designing, implementing and facilitating learning in an active blended learning environment. The topics that would be covered in this workshop include the theoretical perspective of blended learning and deep learning, principles of flipped learning, and how to design for anchor activities. As a participant, you will get to experience the process of learning as a student and as a designer. More importantly, you will be part of a community of practitioners engaged in active blended learning at SUSS, by improving on and contributing to a repository of active blended learning lesson plans, and the training of future instructors.

At the same time, facilitation is often regarded as an important cornerstone for active learning to take place. This is an essential skill particularly in a blended learning approach where learners are to participate in activities during the face-to-face sessions. This workshop aims to equip instructors with the knowledge and skills of facilitation.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

(a) Knowledge & Understanding (Theory Component)
  1. Define the elements of an active blended learning environment
  2. Describe the flipped learning model practiced at SUSS
  3. Justify the learning principles undergirding active blended learning
  4. Describe the various resources and strategies for facilitating active blended learning
(b) Key Skills (Practical Component)
  1. Design an active blended learning activity plan
  2. Construct anchor learning activities that achieve deep learning
AD161: Fundamentals of Assessment

The aim of this workshop is to increase the assessment literacy of participants, so that they appreciate the principles behind good assessment design, as well as the basics of formative and summative assessment. This has important implications for both instructors and course developers as they seek to align curriculum, pedagogy and assessment practices.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to examine and work with quality principles in:

  1. Designing assessment
  2. Interpreting results
  3. Providing feedback
AD163: Writing Better MCQs for Assessment

The aim of this workshop is to help the participants develop and refine their use of multiple choice questions (MCQs) as an assessment tool.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Assessment Writers)

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to address the following:

  1. What are MCQs good for?
  2. Used as a pre-course quiz, what purpose might MCQs serve?
  3. How can we use MCQs to connect (and correct) prior knowledge to new knowledge?
  4. How can MCQs be properly used as a diagnostic tool?
  5. How can we adjust the difficulty levels when writing online MCQs?
  6. How can we write better automated feedback for online MCQs?
  7. What are positive and negative examples of MCQs?
  8. How can MCQs be designed to capture different student answers which may indicate varying degrees of comprehension?
  9. How can MCQs be used to test “application” and “extension”?
AD165: Developing Scoring Rubrics

The aim of this workshop is to help the participants achieve a deeper understanding of performance assessment and rubrics, especially as it pertains to summative assessments in Higher Education.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty (especially for Assessment Writers)

Learning Outcomes

This workshop will discuss some key questions on the appropriate use of rubrics for teaching, learning and assessment:

  1. What kinds of learning outcomes are best assessed with performance assessment? What varieties or kinds of performance assessments are there, especially in Higher Education? What are the benefits and challenges of these forms of assessment?
  2. What are the different kinds of rubrics and what is the link to performance assessments? Would a skill-based curriculum affect the construction of rubrics and assessment design?
  3. How do rubrics fit the broad concept of a mark scheme? What is the proper use of rubrics as a marking guide for summative assessments?
  4. What considerations are important when crafting rubrics? What should we consider before, during and after the construction of rubrics? What are the best practices that make the use of rubrics relevant and manageable?
  5. How should one not use rubrics, such that the purposes of teaching and learning remain well-served?
AD167: Giving Effective Assessment Feedback

This workshop aims to promote effective feedback cultures and practices in the classroom in the context of formative and summative assessments. Productive feedback is intended to take teaching and learning to the next level. Clear learning outcomes, success criteria and evidence of learning are crucial elements in this process.

In this context, the workshop will outline how the provision, receipt and use of feedback for improvement by both instructors and learners requires insight into motivation, self-regulation and appropriate judgments of performance quality.

Target Participants: Associates & Faculty

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the context and conditions under which feedback can positively impact learning
  2. Outline key features of good feedback practice
  3. Promote a feedback culture that encourages student, peer and teacher learning and improvement